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the power on the congress and senate. you have the power of the nra but on the ground so many millions of people are advocating for gun control. so i think at this point, you need to -- when you think about the strategic coalitions that make people power recognize that the nra's not omnipotent, it may behave like god, but actually, it's not. also what we need in schools, more detectives in schools in new york, in urban areas, that's exactly what you have. and what you have is criminalization of young people. particularly people of color. when you think of a piece like mother jones that takes you over 60 years, most of the guns are illegal. >> that's clearly what we have in this case. >> that's what we have, the guns were legal. so what we never want to do is go to where the power and profit sits. so what we do, we talk about we need this for children. and we need to deal -- we need to criminalize the mental health which is what we will do, but what we don't do is treat the issue. >> also, we have a security mind-set, understandably, right? exactly. the impulse of apocalypse for securit
before finally being shot dead by police. the shooting happened at the same time the nra held its press conference in washington, d.c. we'll have more on the nra in just a moment. right now i'm joined by tom kotz, kaley elkins, rich lucivella of "s.w.a.t." magazine, and jackie kellens. thank you for being here. they promised, quote, meaningful contributions to stop gun violence but in a press conference in which the organization took no questions, the executive vice president and ceo wayne lapier's only contribution was his call for armed guards inside all of the nation's schools. >> i call on congress today to act immediately to appropriate whatever is necessary to put armed police officers in every single school in this nation. and to do it now to make sure that blanket safety is in place when our kids return to school in january. >> for 30 minutes lapierre went on a tread that was steadfast, unyielded and trying to blame violence on the insane monster that is pop late our society. but it turned into a glimpse inside the mind of the man who makes the nra, the lobbying arm of the firea
balance that kind of conversation? the sort of nra crowd is saying this is just domestic violence, guns are unrelated. there are statistics out there saying guns make it more likely that it's going to turn deadly. how should that conversation sort of be balanced, do you think? >> i think you are absolutely right. when these things happen, it's too late. what i think is interesting is that the nras hold on the political conversation is actually breaking a little bit. the nra spent a lot of money in the last cycle. they went up against a lot of candidates, lost across the board. i'm hoping their control of the political conversation, i commend mayor bloomburg. he's investing a lot of money and trying to balance out the nra. he's had a lot of victory. it's an important effort. politics have become constrained and the ability to talk about it is constrained. there's a plug at the nra wheels. the less people fear that, politicians, political leaders, the more we engage in a conversation. maybe gun control wasn't the issue per se. background check or other issues. a broader conversation, does
in terms of the government taking your guns. we need to remember that one of the biggest members of the nra are gun manufacturers, who benefits from the sales of guns? the gun manufacturers, the nra is a huge -- they are ones that are stoking the fear of guns being taken away. they get a dollar of a sale of a gun or a package of ammunition at many stores. so they benefit by having this weird relationship where they are stoking the fear that the government is taking the guns away. and gun manufacturers benefit financially and so does the nra, i do not think we should forget about that. >> that is a point worth making. colin, a question, are you a nra member? not to put on the spot. >> i am, i'm a lifetime member. >> do you have high capacity clips? >> i do not. do you see the need to restrict those? >> it's on the edge of what is supposed to be allowed. this is relatively close to it. there's reaches that i think a lot of people are going to talk about. it's possible that a high capacity magazine restriction could be done in a way that is constitutional, and i'm not sure that frankly it's go
, philadelphia governance. >> we have passed some laws in philadelphia and some have made it past the nra lawsuit. and have been sustained by our pennsylvania supreme court. but states and the federal government, there should be a series of pretty strong policies across the united states of america. and then, either states or local governments can enhance, if he want to, but should never be able to low-ball. the u.s. conference of mayors we advocated three major things. one, there should be an assault weapons' ban across united states. no reason for a civilian to ever have an assault rifle, machine gun, multiclips, and so the second part is the large magazines. >> machine guns are banned. >> fully automatic weapons. >> right. if you're putting out hundreds of rounds, you know, a minute, i heap, i'm not going to get into a debate about semiautomatic or automatic, it's a lot. right? large magazines and the clips, 30, 50, you know, 100 rounds, i mean, that's crazy, too. that's the second. >> the shooter aurora had 100-round drums. >> again, why does in the civilian need that? third, we must fix and
, ground zero for the nra but further to the right of gun owners of america. it's a part of our culture. i was raised in a household with guns. my mother later on when she was a widow, had guns. my father was my first hero. and i describe in the piece, i think, for the first time publicly, how he was murdered. and it was not an ak-47. it was not a bushmaster. it was a 22, four bullets to the head. 20 years later, my brother krystofer, we're just a few months apart in age, he was murdered in a remarkably similar fashion. both of them were gun owners. neither of them had an opportunity to defend themselves. they were ambushed. so as a growing person and joining the marine corp, we were taught, everything about weaponry there is. i left the marine corp and have owned a gun nearly every day since. one, because i was a single mother. and with small children in a home and just me and not living in the most desirable neighborhood, i slept near the front door. i was raised in east st. louis and sleeping near the front door was a thank you did. so i did that with a gun under the cushion of the couc
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6

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